Euthanasia: from war crime to act of compassion

February 9, 2015 (LifeSiteNews.com) — The Supreme Court of Canada’s unanimous ruling to legalize assisted suicide in the Carter v. Canada case, is lauded in the media as a victory for compassion and human rights, and as another triumph over the “old order”, which organs of public opinion and government have long declared to be repressive and overdue for reform. For several decades now, step by step they have been busy rewriting the narrative of the West, proposing that the march of history toward a more “humane” society is inevitable and just. Yet, by dismantling the moral foundations of our society—a still largely Christian society—they now leave every human being vulnerable to murder. The sort of humanism they advocate amounts to a belief (rarely stated, but endlessly enacted in practise) that some human beings are less human than others, and thus are disposable. Such is their blindness to the actual lessons of history.

The fall of the Roman Empire, along with the demise of other empires, offer ample evidence that civilizations cannot survive the corruption of their moral foundations. Make no mistake about it: we are under the oppression of a growing oligarchy of moral relativists, who like all social revolutionaries consider themselves to be the heroic champions of a new moral order. Even if some are draped in the mystique of authority and dignified by public office, we would do well to remember that many a past king and high court judge has betrayed the foundational principles that their offices were supposed to defend. Like our own Supreme Court, like our own Parliament, they attempted to rewrite not only the laws but the undergirding principles upon which all just laws are based—“evolving principles,” as they saw it. From a cultural perspective, we might ponder Hans Holbein’s portrait of the majestic Henry VIII, painted the year following Henry’s execution of St. Thomas More. See the trappings of power, the body language, the face, the eyes. Then ponder Holbein’s earlier portrait of More. The contrast is informative, well worth the investment of time. We might also ponder the famous photograph of the members of the Supreme Court of Nazi Germany raising their arms, from the bench, in the Hitler salute. The trappings of the state judiciary, the solemn robes, the dignity of Law, veiled the dark satanic reality beneath the semblance of order.

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